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Rensselaer Research Review
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Innovation at Rensselaer: Space

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Rensselaer’s online research magazine.
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Biotechnology and the Life Sciences Energy, Environment, and Smart Systems
** Computational
Science and Engineering

Unprecedented computing power is making it possible to model entire systems, taking into account interactions at every scale.

Rensselaer, already a leader in automated adaptive modeling and computation, has now built a $100 million supercomputer as part of the Center for Computational Innovations (CCI). It was recently ranked seventh in the world, and it’s the most powerful of any system based exclusively at a university.

In the CCI, Rensselaer is developing simulation technologies for the latest generation of high-performance computing equipment, creating advanced simulations and models for nanoelectronic devices and circuitry, and seeking to understand how proteins, DNA, and other biological systems behave at the molecular level.

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* Rensselaer Research
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* CCNI *
Center for Computational Innovations (CCI)
The Center for Computational Innovations (CCI), one of the most powerful supercomputers based exclusively at a university, is helping Rensselaer researchers address fundamental issues in next-generation semiconductor technology, while also enabling key nanotechnology innovations in energy, biotechnology, new materials, arts, and medicine.
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* MEMS-Based Microscope *
Focusing On Optics
NSF-supported research at Rensselaer’s Center for Automation Technologies and Systems (CATS) has resulted in a new, MEMs-based microscope that provides both a large field of view and high resolution. CATS director John Wen helped devise a solution that subdued vibrations in laser scanning, and applied for the NSF grant that helped him and his colleagues develop the adaptive scanning optical microscope (ASOM).
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* Thz *
Advancing Terahertz Wave Science
Rensselaer is developing new instrumentation to advance terahertz (THz) wave science and technology. Ingrid Wilke, associate professor of physics and a member of the Center for Terahertz Research at Rensselaer, has been awarded an NSF grant to develop the new THz radiation source. The multidisciplinary project involves researchers from physics, electrical engineering, and materials science.
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* Galaxy Evolution *
Galaxy Evolution
The Milky Way galaxy formed from the merging together of small galaxies early in the history of the universe, according to a picture being built by Rensselaer researchers. Some merging continues today, as small galaxies that pass too close to us are ripped apart, scattering stars throughout the galaxy. Many of the stars that were originally born in the smaller, ancient galaxies still persist to this day, now as stars of the Milky Way.
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* CCNI *
Safe Nuclear Reactors
Rensselaer is leading a major research project that will pair two of the world’s most powerful supercomputers to boost the safety and reliability of next-generation nuclear power reactors. The three-year project, funded by DOE, will create highly detailed computer models of a proposed new type of nuclear reactor.
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* Tetherless World *
Tetherless World Research Constellation
Rensselaer’s Tetherless Web Constellation took shape in 2007, with James Hendler named the Senior Constellation Professor in January. In October, Deborah L. McGuinness joined Rensselaer as an endowed Constellation Chair. Their research groups envision an increasingly Web-accessible world in which interactive information and communication is not “tethered” to one location or device such as a personal computer.
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* Modeling Blood Flow *
Modeling Blood Flow
Kenneth Jansen, professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering, is using the power of Rensselaer’s Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations (CCNI) and innovative computational methods to speed his human blood flow models sufficiently to move them from the laboratory to clinical practice.
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* Mobile Studio *
Developing a Mobile Studio
The NSF is funding beta testing of a Mobile Studio project developed by the Academy of Electronic Media at Rensselaer to inexpensively give students hands-on experience with electronics equipment. Director Don Millard and graduate student Jason Coutermarsh conceived of the device to give students the experience of using an oscilloscope, function generator, multimeter, and power supply, all in a package they can carry with them.
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Center for Computational Innovations
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Center for
Computational Innovations
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Rensselaer recently unveiled a new petascale supercomputing system, the Advanced Multiprocessing Optimized System, or AMOS. With the ability to perform more than one quadrillion calculations per second, AMOS is the most powerful university-based supercomputer in New York state and the Northeast, and among the most powerful in the world.
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http://news.rpi.edu/update.do?artcenterkey=2917
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New Supercomputer To Boost Rensselaer Leadership in High-Performance Computing
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Rensselaer has received a $2.65 million NSF grant to install a balanced, green supercomputer at the CCNI supercomputing center.
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The system will be comprised of a powerful IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputer, along with a multiterabyte memory (RAM) storage accelerator, petascale disk storage, rendering cluster, and remote display wall systems.
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DNA Studies Helps Pinpoint Genetic Variations in European Americans
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DNA Studies Helps Pinpoint Genetic Variations in European Americans
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An international team of researchers has identified just 200 positions within the curves of the DNA helix that they believe capture much of the genetic diversity in European Americans, a population with one of the most diverse and complex historic origins on Earth.
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Their findings narrow the search for the elusive ancestral clues known as single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs, that cause disease and account for the minute variations in the European American population.
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