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Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations
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Rensselaer’s Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations is one of the most powerful university-based supercomputing centers in the world.
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Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations

The new Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations (CCNI), one of the most powerful supercomputers based exclusively at a university, is helping Rensselaer researchers address fundamental issues in next-generation semiconductor technology, while also enabling key nanotechnology innovations in energy, biotechnology, new materials, arts, and medicine.

The CCNI, the result of a $100 million partnership involving Rensselaer, IBM, and New York state, provides a platform for researchers to perform a broad range of computational simulations, from the interactions between atoms and molecules up to the behavior of complete devices.

Research is closely coordinated with work in Rensselaer’s Scientific Computation Research Center (SCOREC), which has long been a leader in developing reliable high-performance simulation technologies. A new set of SCOREC projects, supported by IBM funding, uses the power of the CCNI to conduct virtual fabrication of nanoelectronics.

Assad Oberai, associate professor of mechanical engineering, is building supercomputing tools for the design and analysis of new “superresolution” lithography, which creates features that are smaller than 193 nanometers. Kenneth Jansen, associate professor of mechanical engineering, is simulating next-generation, 3-D, massively parallel devices. Saroj Nayak, professor of physics, is modeling silicon CMOS technology for nanoscale electronics. Mark Shephard, SCOREC director, and postdoc Max Bloomfield are simulating reactive ion etching. Christopher Carothers, associate professor of computer science, is working on electronic design automation for multithreaded parallel computers.

“The goal is to extend the advanced technologies that we have been developing at Rensselaer to meet the problems facing IBM as they go to nanoelectronic-scale devices,” says Shephard. The projects will be enhanced by the develop-ment of petascale computing technologies and tools, funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

See also:
Opening a World-Class Supercomputing Center (Rensselaer Research Review)
SuperPower (Rensselaer Magazine)

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