*
*
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
About RPI Academics Research Student Life Admissions News Tour
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Office for Research
Faculty INterest Inventory
Research Centers
Research Constellations
Student Research
*
*

Research Compliance

Responsible Conduct of Research

Links for Researchers

Core Facilities

Funding Opportunities

Grant Assistance

Conflict of Interest Policy

Conflict of Interest
Disclosure Form

Environmental
Health & Safety

Research Related Policies

Entrepreneurship

Office of Technology Commercialization

Technology Park

Research
Administration & Finance

Export Control

*
*
Rensselaer Research Review
*

Innovation at Rensselaer: Space

*
Rensselaer’s online research magazine.
*
Biotechnology and the Life Sciences Energy, Environment, and Smart Systems
** Nanotechnology
and Advanced Materials

Nanotechnology—the ability to control materials and devices at the atomic and molecular level—is enabling revolutionary changes.

Building upon the Institute’s traditional strengths in materials science and engineering, Rensselaer researchers are part of a pre-eminent group of scientists around the world working to manipulate matter with atomic precision.

With an NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center on campus, a new microelectronics clean room capable of fabrication on the nano-level, and a talented group of biotechnology researchers bringing nano-capabilities to their work, Rensselaer has taken a place at the heart of what has been framed by some as the next “industrial revolution”.

*
*
* Rensselaer Research
*
* Carbon Nanotube Versatility *
Carbon Nanotube Versatility
Ranging from a potential new water desalination technology to airplane wings that can diagnose and heal their own cracks, several projects led by Nikhil Koratkar, associate professor of mechanical engineering, are demonstrating the usefulness and versatility of carbon nanotubes.
*
* Stuck On "Nanoglue" *
Stuck On “Nanoglue”
Materials that don’t normally stick together can be bonded by using a one-nanometer-high layer of self-assembling polymer chains, a Rensselaer team has discovered. The extraordinarily thin “nanoglue,” which gains strength as temperatures rise, could be a breakthrough for next-generation computer chips, and it could also be useful in such applications as high-temperature coatings.
*
* Graphene *
Making Computers From a Pencil Trace
Rensselaer researchers have discovered a new technique to exploit the extremely efficient conductive properties of graphene. Working with graduate student Philip Shemella and others, Saroj Nayak, associate professor of physics, applied physics, and astronomy, has demonstrated for the first time that the length and width of graphene directly impacts the material’s conduction properties.
*
* Theodorian Borca-Tasciuc *
Strengthening Fluids With Nanoparticles
Researchers have demonstrated that liquids embedded with nanoparticles show enhanced performance and stability when exposed to electric fields. The finding could lead to new types of miniature camera lenses, cell phone displays, and other microscale fluidic devices.
*
* Nanotubes *
Helping Nanotubes Get Into Shape
Rensselaer researchers have developed a new method of compacting carbon nanotubes into dense bundles that are efficient electrical conductors and could one day replace copper as the primary interconnects used on computer chips. They may also hasten the transition to next-generation 3-D stacked chips.
*
*
 
Center for Computational Innovations
*
Center for
Computational Innovations
* *
Rensselaer recently unveiled a new petascale supercomputing system, the Advanced Multiprocessing Optimized System, or AMOS. With the ability to perform more than one quadrillion calculations per second, AMOS is the most powerful university-based supercomputer in New York state and the Northeast, and among the most powerful in the world.
*
*
* *
*
“At Rensselaer, we make all our own nanoscale building blocks, from nanoparticles to nanotubes to hybrid structures comprised of both. That gives us a tremendous advantage in terms of controlling the nature of these structures and how they relate to one another.”
*
—Richard Siegel, director of the Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center
*
*
* *
*
*
Page updated: 12/17/10, 6:59 PM
*
Copyright ©2010 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)  110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY USA 12180  (518) 276-6000  All rights reserved.
*
Why not change the world?® is a registered trademark of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
Site design and production by the Rensselaer Division of Strategic Communications & External Relations
*
*
*